Celebrate Life Below Water. Eat Blue

Naomi Clark-Shen

Naomi Clark-Shen

Naomi was born, raised and currently lives in Singapore. She is doing a PhD on sharks and stingrays caught by fisheries in Southeast Asia. Prior to this, she worked on a variety of independent and consultancy marine projects for organisations including WWF, TRAFFIC, and National Geographic. Having turned vegetarian at age 11, Naomi is passionate about animal welfare and compassionate living. In her spare time she looks after her rescue pets and keeps active through cycling, wrestling, squash and diving.
Speciesism [spee-shee-ziz-uhm] is defined as ‘the practice of treating members of one species as morally more important than members of other species’ (Britannica, 2013). In part one of this series, we explored speciesism in
Speciesism [spee-shee-ziz-uhm]: ‘the practice of treating members of one species as morally more important than members of other species’ (Britannica, 2013). Ultimately, speciesism can manifest in the preferential treatment of some species and the
Fishes have long been underestimated in their cognitive ability. A memory of just three seconds? Try one year! That’s right – pike showed ‘hook shyness’ for over one year after getting hooked by a
The battle about whether fishes feel pain has raged for years. Scientists previously argued that fishes cannot feel pain because they do not possess a neocortex part of the mammalian brain used for higher-order